research

*for complete recent cv in pdf form see my faculty page here

EMPLOYMENT

2018-present: Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

2014-2018: Lecturer, Department of Classical Studies, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

EDUCATION

2016: Ph.D. Classical Archaeology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

2010: M.A. Classical Archaeology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

2008: B.A. in Archaeology, Classical Humanities, and History, The George Washington University.

SELECT PUBLICATIONS

Le Blanc, R. In press. “Iuba,” “Garamantes,” “Musulamii,” “Africa,” “Carthage,” “Mauritania,” “Poeni,” “Tacfarinas,” “Numidia,” and “Phoenicia”. In The Tacitus Encyclopedia, V.E. Pagán (ed.) Wiley-Blackwell. (Anticipated publication 2022).

Le Blanc, R. In press. “The Marsyas of the Forum Motif on Coins from Roman Mesopotamia and Osrhoene,” Numismatic Chronicle 191.

Le Blanc, R. 2019. “The Glass of Islamic Ashkelon.” In Ashkelon 8: The Islamic and Crusader Periods, T. Hoffman (ed.). University Park, PA: Eisenbrauns. 575–628.

Le Blanc, R. 2017. “Founders and Foundation Myths on Civic Coins from Late Hellenistic and Roman Ascalon (Israel),” Israel Numismatic Research 12: 71-98.

Boehm, R., D. Master, and R. Le Blanc. 2016. “The Basilica, Bouleuterion, and  Civic Center of Ashkelon,” American Journal of Archaeology 120(2): 271-324.

SELECT AWARDS, GRANTS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

James Y. Joyner Award for Teaching Excellence, UNCG, 2020.

Co-PI, “Memory & Landscapes,” Interdisciplinary faculty study collaborative groups, Transforming the Humanities at a Minority Serving Institution, UNCG and Mellon Foundation, 2019-2020.

New Faculty Grant, UNCG, 2018-2019.

Undergraduate Research and Creativity Office Faculty Fellow, UNCG, 2019.

Martin Price Fund for Ancient Greek Numismatics, Royal Numismatic Society, 2018.

National Endowment for the Humanities Institute, Summer Institute, “Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom,” 2018.

Digital Partners Grant, UNCG, 2018.

UNC System-Wide Undergraduate Research Development Grant, “Course-Based Digital Humanities Undergraduate Research through Faculty-Led Digital Projects: WIRE (Women in the Roman East) as a case study project,” 2018.

SELECT INVITED PAPERS

“Show me the money!: on Roman savings banks.” Keynote address, Illuminating the Past: Utilitarian Ceramics of the Ancient World symposium, the Miami University Art Museum, October 2019.

“Relocating Andromeda: Greco-Roman myths and heroes in Roman Iudaea, Syria Palaestina, and Arabia.” The Department of Classical Languages at  Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, 2017.

“The Importance of Being Greek: gods and heroes in Roman Palestine.” North Carolina Classical Association Spring Meeting, Winston-Salem, 2015.

RECENT CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“Localizing a Roman colonial identity on civic coinage: the Marsyas of the Forum type in its local contexts.” VLAC II (Visual Languages of Ancient Coins, Tracing the Local(s), Goethe University Frankfurt, 2019.

“Marsyas of the Forum and in the Provinces.” CAMWS Lincoln, NE, 2019.

Presenter in workshop, “Centering the Margins: Creating Inclusive Syllabi,” organized by R.F. Kennedy, SCS San Diego 2018.

“Why is Poseidon on coins of Rabbathmoba in Roman Arabia?” CAMWS-SS Winston-Salem, 2018.

“Introducing WIRE: Women in the Roman East Project.” With Sean P. Burrus. Lightning paper Ancient Makerspaces session, AIA Boston, 2018.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK

Doclea Excavations, Podgorica, Montenegro (2019): research, field school, and field school co-director 

The Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon (2009-2012 + ongoing publication work)

The Megiddo Expedition (2006, 2008)

The Marcham-Frilford Project (2007)

*****

more about current excavation and digital projects

Romans in Illyricum–Doclea Excavations

*Please note: due to COVID-19, the summer 2020 season has been canceled.

Doclea was a Roman city and administrative center in the province of Dalmatia, located today on the outskirts of Podgorica in Montenegro. Excavations and exploration of the site since the 19th century have revealed three temples, a forum and basilica, two churches, tombs, the main city streets, and residential buildings. More details here.

 

WIRE: Women in the Roman East 

WIRE is an online database (currently in beta) that allows visitors to explore the roles and experiences of women in the ancient Roman Near East. Many of the entries were input by students as part of undergraduate research projects or course-based undergraduate research experiences (CURES). The site will eventually include pedagogical suggestions and materials. Visit and explore the database at wireproject.org.

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